Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?

Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?

A brand president shared a story with me about his recent interviewing experience. After receiving an interview confirmation with the CEO of a multibillion-dollar global apparel company, he arrived at the corporate headquarters only to be informed that there had been a mix-up: The CEO was traveling for business on the West Coast and would not be available. The SVP of HR met with him instead and—for the next 60 minutes—proceeded to bash the company’s internal communication practices. There was no follow-up from anyone at the company, including the CEO.

This anecdote—about poor candidate relationship management—inspired my latest article for Forbes, “Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?”

A simple Google search for “bad job interviews” returns more than 15 million results. Whether it is being stood up, being treated rudely, or receiving no feedback, poor candidate relationship management is on the rise.

Most of us—regardless of our age—can still vividly recall our worst experiences as a candidate. Prior to social media, we may have shared our experiences with a few friends and family members and then dropped it. But today? Remember that old adage “bad news travels fast?” Well, “fast” has been replaced by “warp speed,” as social media has enabled anything to become viral and remain a few clicks away for eternity.

Why does this happen? The Talent Board, specializing in candidate experience research, identifies many factors that can derail candidate relationship management. The following three rise to the surface:

  1. Communication.Whether internal (human resources and department hiring manager) or external (recruitment firm), information is not being shared consistently and who owns what part of the process is unclear.
  2. Training. Oftentimes individuals have not been trained in how to conduct an interview.
  3. Culture. A workplace may be understaffed and the time needed for an employee’s own work will supersede his or her ability to participate constructively in the candidate recruitment process.

To read more about how you can improve candidate relationship management, visit Forbes.

If you are looking for a partner to help you prepare for your executive job search, contact me to learn more about how we can work together.

Are You Prepared for Your Executive Job Search?

your executive job searchFollowing are excerpts from a leadership article I recently penned for Forbes. To read the full article, visit Forbes.

Preparing for your executive job search by activating some powerful marketing strategies will equip you with the foundation you need to launch yourself into the contemporary job market.

But finding the time to pause, determine what you want, take stock of what you bring to the table, and create compelling  executive job search assets (such as your resume and LinkedIn profile) presents a challenge for many, regardless of level or industry.

Today’s job market can be extremely intimidating to those poised for an executive job search. I have found that the best approach is to treat your search with the same level of discipline that a marketer applies to the launch of a new brand. In fact, there are numerous parallels between “Marketing 101” and a job search, with you as the “brand” and your future employer as the “target audience.”

  • Know Your Objectives
  • Do Your Research
  • Perform a Personal Brand Audit
  • Build Your Team
  • Determine Your Positioning and Craft Your Messaging
  • Create Your Job-Search Assets
  • Reignite Relationships and Network

While it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly how long it will take to land your next job, one thing is certain — you need to be prepared before you actively engage in your executive job search.

If you are looking for a partner to help you prepare for your executive job search, contact me to learn more about how we can work together.

The Executive Leadership Gene: Do You Possess It?

The Executive Leadership Gene: Do You Possess It?

Is executive leadership a matter of nature, nurture, or both? Probably the latter but nature likely plays a much larger role than anyone had imagined.  Have you heard of rs4950? No, it is not a new Star Wars character but is “the leadership gene,” an inherited DNA sequence associated with natural leadership.  Its discovery created quite a stir when Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, PhD, University College London & Centre for Economic Performance (LSE) and his team identified the heritability of leadership skills.  Their findings revealed “genes might affect the development of individual attributes affecting the predisposition to occupy a leadership position.”

Regardless of genetics, my executive clients are—undeniably—leaders in their industries.  When I work with executives to craft their individual career narratives, the focus of our discussion is on uncovering their “unique leadership DNA”: the skills, knowledge, attributes, and career accomplishments that make them different than every other leader who does what they do at their level and in their space.

In order to convey key points of executive leadership distinction and unique business value, it is crucial to identify your common experience and success threads, including the ways in which you’ve influenced the business, the operation, the organization, the culture, process, technology, people, and relationships.  Equally important to demonstrate are the specific types of business problems you can help a company solve and how this aligns to your past experience.

If you are looking for a partner to help identify and convey your unique executive leadership DNA, contact me to learn more about how we can work together.