Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?

Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?

A brand president shared a story with me about his recent interviewing experience. After receiving an interview confirmation with the CEO of a multibillion-dollar global apparel company, he arrived at the corporate headquarters only to be informed that there had been a mix-up: The CEO was traveling for business on the West Coast and would not be available. The SVP of HR met with him instead and—for the next 60 minutes—proceeded to bash the company’s internal communication practices. There was no follow-up from anyone at the company, including the CEO.

This anecdote—about poor candidate relationship management—inspired my latest article for Forbes, “Candidate Relationship Management: Is Neglect The New Normal?”

A simple Google search for “bad job interviews” returns more than 15 million results. Whether it is being stood up, being treated rudely, or receiving no feedback, poor candidate relationship management is on the rise.

Most of us—regardless of our age—can still vividly recall our worst experiences as a candidate. Prior to social media, we may have shared our experiences with a few friends and family members and then dropped it. But today? Remember that old adage “bad news travels fast?” Well, “fast” has been replaced by “warp speed,” as social media has enabled anything to become viral and remain a few clicks away for eternity.

Why does this happen? The Talent Board, specializing in candidate experience research, identifies many factors that can derail candidate relationship management. The following three rise to the surface:

  1. Communication.Whether internal (human resources and department hiring manager) or external (recruitment firm), information is not being shared consistently and who owns what part of the process is unclear.
  2. Training. Oftentimes individuals have not been trained in how to conduct an interview.
  3. Culture. A workplace may be understaffed and the time needed for an employee’s own work will supersede his or her ability to participate constructively in the candidate recruitment process.

To read more about how you can improve candidate relationship management, visit Forbes.

If you are looking for a partner to help you prepare for your executive job search, contact me to learn more about how we can work together.

Are You Prepared for Your Executive Job Search?

your executive job searchFollowing are excerpts from a leadership article I recently penned for Forbes. To read the full article, visit Forbes.

Preparing for your executive job search by activating some powerful marketing strategies will equip you with the foundation you need to launch yourself into the contemporary job market.

But finding the time to pause, determine what you want, take stock of what you bring to the table, and create compelling  executive job search assets (such as your resume and LinkedIn profile) presents a challenge for many, regardless of level or industry.

Today’s job market can be extremely intimidating to those poised for an executive job search. I have found that the best approach is to treat your search with the same level of discipline that a marketer applies to the launch of a new brand. In fact, there are numerous parallels between “Marketing 101” and a job search, with you as the “brand” and your future employer as the “target audience.”

  • Know Your Objectives
  • Do Your Research
  • Perform a Personal Brand Audit
  • Build Your Team
  • Determine Your Positioning and Craft Your Messaging
  • Create Your Job-Search Assets
  • Reignite Relationships and Network

While it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly how long it will take to land your next job, one thing is certain — you need to be prepared before you actively engage in your executive job search.

If you are looking for a partner to help you prepare for your executive job search, contact me to learn more about how we can work together.

Demonstrating Executive Leadership Through Your Resume

Demonstrating Executive Leadership Through Your Resume

Innovation — “driving growth, new products, and new methods of delivering value to customers”* — is critical in business but remains difficult to cultivate and quantify. Harvard Business Review recently published an article on five qualities that innovative leaders share. They are:

  • Maintaining a Strategic Business Perspective: At the core of every innovative leader is a thorough understanding of their industry — the broader market, competitive landscape, and customer base — and a clear view on how industry trends will affect their business in both the short and long term.
  • Demonstrating Curiosity: Innovative leaders embody curiosity. They possess a lifelong desire to learn, frequently ask questions, and stimulate new ways of thinking in themselves and others.
  • Seizing Opportunities: Being proactive when presented with an unexpected opportunity is a frequently cited executive leadership quality. Innovative leaders are also able to change direction rapidly but responsibly, and without indulging in over-analysis.
  • Managing Risk: A greater risk-taking tolerance to advance the business is a hallmark of innovative leadership. Experimenting with new approaches is a shared trait, as is the ability to quickly respond when there are setbacks.
  • Leading Courageously: Not averse to conflicts, innovative leaders transform challenging situations into opportunities to demonstrate their decisiveness and are accountable when making difficult decisions.

If those qualities sound familiar, you are probably like my clients: successful, driven, and at the top of your industry. Yet, translating the traits of innovative leaders into a career narrative suitable for a resume remains elusive for many.

Resumes that make a real impact highlight value through career accomplishments — and the metrics associated with those accomplishments. My process for achieving that finished product — the resume — involves a depth of engagement with my clients to help uncover their leadership strengths, differentiators, and successes.

*Visit Harvard Business Review  to read more about innovation and the five qualities that innovative leaders share, or contact me directly to discuss how to extend your executive leadership accomplishments onto your resume.

Your Executive Resume: How to Include 25 Years of Work Experience

Your Executive Resume: How to Include 25 Years of Work Experience

Do you ever watch those “Year in Review” segments on television and marvel at how broadcasters manage to convert the essence of a year into a three-minute story?  Identifying essential content is a crucial skill for journalists because a lot happens in just one year and the duration of their segments must be adhered to—or they lose their audience.

Imagine trying an approach like that with your career and your executive resume: a “Career in Review,” if you will?

It’s not easy.

Many of my clients approach me because they are leaders in their industry, have been with their company for more than ten years, and are struggling to separate the “must include” information from the “nice to include” information in their executive resume. They have achieved great success but need to identify their career milestones and determine a compelling narrative for their executive resume.

When I begin working with my clients, I ask them to take a step back and think about their tangible achievements, such as:

  • The teams they have assembled
  • The sizes of the businesses they have led
  • The brands or products they have developed or launched
  • The complex business problems they have solved
  • The business changes they have steered
  • The technology they have implemented
  • The new strategies they have employed
  • The markets they have penetrated or channels they have expanded

This approach arms me with some of the essential building blocks I need to begin to craft an effective—and concise—executive resume.

If you are looking for a partner to help make you as marketable as possible, contact me today to learn more about how we can work together.